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visit Mai Chau and Ha Long Bay

Stilt houses border both sides of the roads. The houses are quite large with palm leaf roofs and polished bamboo-slat floors. The kitchen is located in the center of the house; the cooking as well as the making of the colorful tho cam, the material used by Thai minority to make their clothes, takes place in the kitchen. The windows are large and decorated with patterns. Each house also has a pond to breed fish.
The Sunday market brings a lot of people into town. People from different minorities living in the mountains come to Mai Chau market to sell their specific products: honey, bananas, corn, and tho cam made by skilled Thai women. The Sunday market is also an occasion to enjoy traditional Thai dishes and to participate in traditional dances.
Mai Chau can be a base for some trekking tours to the villages around, this is with homestay overnight on the traditional houses of the H”Mong and the Thai. Worth a guided trekking tour there. Hoa Binh is a mountainous province located in the North. It is bordered by Son La in the West, Phu Tho and Ha Tay in the North, Ha Nam and Ninh Binh in the East, and Thanh Hoa in the South. The culture of Hoa Binh combines six minorities with their own languages, traditional literature, and festivals. Tourists especially enjoy the minority specialty dishes including rice cooked in bamboo and grilled meat. They also enjoy watching traditional dancing, music performances (bronze, drums, gongs), and Thai minority singing and dancing. The remote minority villages are attractive sites for tourists.
Halong Bay lies in the Gulf of Tonkin to the east of Hanoi. It consists of some 3000 tiny islands which together form a dramatic limestone seascape which is without a doubt Vietnam’s most natural wonder. If you’re in Hanoi after getting Vietnam visa then you simply MUST ensure that you find time for an overnight visit to this UNESCO World Heritage Site. Legend has it that Halong Bay was created when a dragon that lived in the mountains ran to the sea its mighty tail gouged out valleys and crevasses, the areas dug up by its tail became filled with water leaving only the high land visible. Geologists on the other hand blame wind and sea erosion! Visitors who were previously in Thailand will notice a close similarity with the limestone scenery around Krabi on the south west coast.
More details: Dulichso.com
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